Nationalism and State Sovereignty Lesson 3 Rise of Nationalism in the U.S. and in Non-Western Countries
  
 
 
 
Nationalism and State Sovereignty Lesson 3 Rise of Nationalism in the U.S. and in Non-Western Countries

Overview
This first part of this lesson, focusing on documents from the United States, keeps the lens on the nineteenth-century evolution and maturation of the fundamental western constructs of nation, state, and sovereignty.  The second part of this lesson begins a thematic shift concentrating on the reception and appropriation of the above-mentioned constructs, in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, by peoples in countries and regions now customarily regarded as “non-western.”

This lesson explores and delineates the emergence of western-inspired (one could also cast it as “western-provoked”), yet locally, regionally particular and fervent “nationalisms” in the twentieth century.  The west, due in large part to its two generations of internecine global warfare and the collapse of its empire, underwent internal transformation and has increasingly found itself compelled to accommodate new global loci of influence and power, whose assertions of identity and sovereignty may be traced back to the west’s own earlier advancement of such notions.

Relevant Objectives
3.    Describe in abstract terms the basic interplay and connections, the tensions and conflict, between the nationalism and sovereignty of the contemporary nation-state and the pressures, demands, and exigencies imposed by global forces.

Procedure

Pre-class Assignment
• Students read the assigned documents before class:  American Federation of Labor reading, Announcement to the Arabs reading, Jamal ad-Din reading, and Testimony from Joint Special Congressional Committee on Chineese Immigration

Possible Classroom Activities

Resources

Optional Resources

 

Next: Nationalism and State Sovereignty Lesson 4 Nationalism in Africa, Turkey, and Mexico