Global Health Lesson 4 Activities
Health Lesson 4 Introduction

Time: 5-7 minutes
Skills: n/a
Objective:3
Resources: n/a

What is culture?                                 

Put responses on board and discuss.  Underscore key elements for a class understanding/definition – important for public/global health.

 *Option:  View a selection of definitions compiled by the Intercultural Studies Project at the University of Minnesota’s Center for Advanced Research on Language Acquisition:  http://www.carla.umn.edu/culture/definitions.html.

Health Lesson 4 Cultural Compass Activity

Time: 30 minutes
Skills: Holistic Thinking and Cross-Cultural Communications
Objectives 3 & 4
Related Resources:
-  Cultural Compass
- Mental Health Ministries, “Jewish Families of Faith and Mental Illness” (2007, March 5). (4 min., 36 sec.) Retrieved from:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=js0MbIknaRc
- National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI), “Asian American/Pacific Islanders and Mental Health” (2011, February 11). (6 min., 37 sec.) Retrieved from: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s4iSGlAjneA&feature=related
-National Allianceon Mental Illness (NAMI), Mental Health in the Latino Community – NAMI NJ 2009 Conference in Spanish (English video) (5 min., 20 sec.) Retrieved from: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s4iSGlAjneA&feature=related 
- Peers Envisioning and Engaging in and Recovery, “Mental Health Matters: Challenges in Native American Healing” (5 min. 41 sec.) Retrieved from: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9qRE_XxfZFg
- QuranSpeaks, “Health and Well Being,” from Canadian Public Television’s Let the Quran Speak (2008, December 7). Retrieved from: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZhPeuXF0IT0&feature=related

Pass out “Cultural Compass” to the students. “Your readings describe the enormous influence that culture can have on health and the ways which people interact with health resources. This exercise will help students think about their own culture(s) and the cultural messages that you go about health.

To build holistic thinking skills, this activity needs to be carried out in a multi-cultural classroom. If students have the same background, the teacher will need to provide examples of how the answers change based on culture/ethnicity/religion/nationality/etc.  One way that can be done is by showing a couple of videos about different cultural perspectives on a specific health issue. For example, the instructor could show the video clips on cultural perspectives on mental health – perhaps those not seen by most students.

Pass out “Cultural Compass” to the students.

To students:  “Your readings describe the enormous influence that culture can have on health and the ways in which people interact with health resources. This exercise will help students think about their own culture(s) and the cultural messages that these cultures may impart about health.

Instructions for the Cultural Compass:

o “First identify the culture(s) to which you belong. Culture can be based on many things such as: race or ethnicity, religion, the area in which you live (e.g. city or farm culture, your occupation (e.g. student culture), hobbies or abilities (e.g. gaming culture).
o “After you have listed all of the cultures with which you identify, circle one that is very important to you, or one from which you received lots of health-related messages.
o “In each corner of the compass, list the beliefs or messages that you received as a member of your culture about these things. What messages, for instance, did you receive about what you should do or be as a man or a woman? How do people in your culture act when someone they love is very ill or dies? What about mental illness, which is emphasized in our readings and videos?

Once students have completed the activity, lead a discussion in the messages that they received and the ways in which those messages have influenced their lives and health-related behaviors.

Health Lesson 4 Discussion of Culture and Health

Time: 20-25 minutes
Skills: Holistic Thinking
Objectives 3 & 4
Related Resources:
- Gerard, N.K. (2000). In the Shadow of the Temple: Cross-cultural Sensitivity in International Health Program Development. In Ethnicity & Health, 5,2;161-171.
- When Culture Helps Saving Women’s Lives in Senegal (2011, December 12). Fitness News. Retrieved from: http://www.womenfitness.net/news/womens_health/saving_women.htm?no_redirect=true

“The readings gave many examples of how culture can be both a barrier and a facilitator for health.  Follow-up questions:

o What about cultural practices or beliefs with which we disagree, for instance the idea that literacy is not important for women?
o Do what extent are gender inequities perpetuating health inequalities? How does the treatment of women affect the health of all?
o Is introducing our health practices and beliefs to other cultures unfairly imposing our culture on them?
o Is or should health be culture-free? Can/should anything be culture-free?

Health Lesson 4 Conclusion: Reflection and Application

Time: 5 minutes
Skills: Holistic Thinking and Cross-Cultural Communications
Objective 3
Related Resources: n/a 

Our readings emphasized global health and the videos focused on cultural diversity in theUnited States.  How are these connected and what are the implications for health care providers and delivery systems?

*Can be done as a “quick write” to discuss and/or for instructor to collect